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Clinical Trials

Date: 2017-05-04

Type of information: Presentation of results at a congress

phase: preclinical

Announcement: presentation of results at the PEGS Third Annual Agonist Immunotherapy Targets conference in Boston

Company: Alligator Bioscience (Sweden)

Product: ATOR-1015

Action mechanism: bispecific antibody. ATOR-1015 is a bispecific antibody for tumor-directed immunotherapy and is fully owned and developed by Alligator for the treatment of metastatic cancer. ATOR-1015 binds to two different immune receptors: the checkpoint receptor CTLA-4, and the co-stimulatory receptor OX40. ATOR-1015 is developed to reduce immune suppressive functions including regulatory T cells, as well as to induce direct T-cell activation. The immune activation is augmented in areas where both target molecules are expressed at high levels, notably in the tumor microenvironment, which is believed to reduce adverse immune reactions.

Disease:

Therapeutic area: Cancer - Oncology

Country:

Trial details:

Latest news:

  • • On May 4, 2017, Alligator Bioscience presented new pre-clinical data on its wholly-owned bi-specific OX40 and CTLA-4 dual targeting antibody, ATOR-1015, at the PEGS Third Annual Agonist Immunotherapy Targets conference in Boston. Dr Peter Ellmark, Principal Scientist at Alligator, gave an oral presentation titled: “Tumor-Directed Immunotherapy – Tumor-Localized Immune Activation Using TNFR-SF Agonistic Antibodies” and the key data follows. The ATOR-1015 mechanism of action was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrated tumor-directed immune activation. ATOR-1015 activated effector T-cells and suppressed regulatory T-cells in tumors, but not elsewhere in the body. Additional data included demonstration of anti-tumor effects in multiple tumor models and a strong data package on critical development properties including high solubility, thermal stability and manufacturing yield. Alligator Biosciences is now looking forward to initiating clinical development of ATOR-1015 in 2018.

Is general: Yes